Plant Focus – Bounce Impatiens

In years past, Impatiens were considered the epitome of a summer flower for shady locations. They featured long bloom time, ease of growing, and a punch of color. However, in the past few years they have also featured Downy Mildew, a disease that affects impatiens by causing leaves to turn yellow and the plant to die. Without any effective treatments and a spreading problem, the recommendation was to stop planting impatiens altogether.

In response, nurseries began breeding new plant material. They focused on new and improved varieties of Begonia, Sunpatiens, and Coleus, among other shade tolerant plants. Though this gave us options, what was missing most was the fantastic color selection that the impatiens had given us. That problem has been solved by the introduction of the Bounce Impatiens.

Bounce Impatiens are available in colors including: violet, lavender, lilac, cherry, and white. Their color options, however, are just one of the benefits of having this plant on the market. Bounce impatiens boast their large, bright, self-cleaning flowers on sturdy branches reaching a height of 20-30” at maturity. These easy to grow plants will “Bounce” back quickly after a dry spell or few missed waterings. Through the hottest days of summer, Bounce Impatiens will deliver the dramatic floral impact we love to see in a shade garden.

White Bounce Impatien
White Bounce Impatiens
Cherry Bounce Impatien
Cherry Bounce Impatiens
Lavender Bounce Impatien
Lavender Bounce Impatiens
Violet Bounce Impatien
Violet Bounce Impatiens
Lilac Bounce Impatien
Lilac Bounce Impatiens

Office Tower Wins ILCA Gold Award!

Congratulations to our team for winning the Illinois Landscape Contractors Gold Award in the Special Events category. This is the 2nd consecutive year we have won the gold award in this category.

Every year U.S. Equities strives to make an impact on The Magnificent Mile by creating Seasonal Displays that are unique from the other gardens on the Avenue.  This year we encouraged the client to remove a large water feature located in the parkway beds. Using large Japanese Maples, we created a ‘garden in the city’ feel that left the water feature a faint memory.  These maples are unique to the Avenue and helped soften both the buildings from the street and the street traffic from pedestrians.

Removing the water feature helped to make the most of the small spaces of the Michigan Avenue beds. We benefited from the additional bed space that allowed for a more intricate design with layers, colors, and textures. Similarly, to enhance the sidewalk café on Huron, seasonal containers separated diners from pedestrians adding to ‘garden in the city’ ambiance. Similar plants used in both settings correlate the property as a whole.

Our unique plant choices and placement of the plants has resulted in a breathtaking annual display on Michigan Avenue.

Many thanks to Kurt Pflederer, Allie Corbett, Ed Hoffman, Cesario Moreno, Brian Walsh, Miguel Espinosa, Salvador Rojas Jr., and Renee TeVogt for their help in making this project a success!

In the midst of the hustle of Michigan Avenue, café dwellers relax in the secluded space created from the lush garden in the seasonal containers.
In the midst of the hustle of Michigan Avenue, café dwellers relax in the secluded space created from the lush garden in the seasonal containers.
Large Japanese Maples and other street trees accentuate the density of the garden in the city. When standing in close proximity to the garden, the surrounding city becomes merely a backdrop to the stately garden.
Large Japanese Maples and other street trees accentuate the density of the garden in the city. When standing in close proximity to the garden, the surrounding city becomes merely a backdrop to the stately garden.
Round topiaries add structure and formality to the seasonal containers lining the café area. These introduce a comfortable barrier between café dwellers and pedestrians in addition to the dense garden surrounding them.
Round topiaries add structure and formality to the seasonal containers lining the café area. These introduce a comfortable barrier between café dwellers and pedestrians in addition to the dense garden surrounding them.
Passing pedestrians are drawn to take a closer look at the elaborate use of textures in the seasonal containers.
Passing pedestrians are drawn to take a closer look at the elaborate use of textures in the seasonal containers.

Paul Hughes Featured in Chicagoland Gardening Magazine

Paul Hughes, our material coordinator and buyer of annual color in the Fox Valley office, was recently featured in the Chicagoland Gardening Magazine. The article asked several plant experts about their favorite bulbs. According to Paul, the bulb that gets the most attention on our commercial sites is crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis). He also really likes winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis). Here is a link to the article online!

Check out the fritillaria (yellow up-side down looking flower) in front of the Crate and Barrel Store on Michigan Avenue. Our friends at Hoerr Schaudt designed this beautiful planting!
Check out the fritillaria (yellow up-side down looking flower) in front of the Crate and Barrel Store on Michigan Avenue. Our friends at Hoerr Schaudt designed this beautiful planting!